system mtn

Rear-entry step-in bindings are more popular than ever nowadays. They provide a good amount of convenience, shave off some of the time you spend on the top of the hill and don’t really fall behind from the traditional bindings in terms of comfort and response. The System MTN Rear-entry snowboard bindings are yet another decent budget option for people looking for a durable all-mountain binding that has a good amount of flex to it and is perfect for almost any type of riding style.

My Verdict: Budget-friendly, reliable, and easy to use, the new MTNs are a solid choice for anyone looking for a good all-rounder that will stand the test of time and won’t burn a hole through their pocket. There are a few issues with the straps and compatibility which might be a major drawback if you have an older Burton board or boots with size 13 and above. 

Below, I will go through some of the most important features of the new System MTNs and will also show you some of what I consider their biggest drawbacks compared to their competition.

Overview & Features

Even though Burton has revolutionized the design of the binding with their step-on technology, rear-entry is still one of the most common types of bindings out there for a few main reasons. First of all, it is cheaper and better designed (so far), and secondly, it doesn’t require you to have special boots to fit in it. The System MTNs also have another smart feature when it comes to strapping in, which allows you to tighten the ankle strap just by pulling the lever on the side. But more on that later. Now, let’s being with the flex and response of this model…

System MTN Step in Snowboard Bindings

Our Rating: (4.5/5)

system mtn

  • Great budget option
  • Beginner-friendly
  • Easy rear-entry design
  • Toe cap strap
  • The ankle strap has a quick-adjust lever
  • Construction is well-built
  • Good flex for all-mountain conditions
  • Compatible with all types of boards

Flex & Response

The response here is decent and the flex is quite good, especially if you plan on taking these bindings to the park. Most of that is thanks to the flexible highback (3/10) which has both toe-to-heel flexibility and lateral one. That makes control easy, although it isn’t perfect for high-speed slopes or deep powder where you will need more direct control and contact with the board.

As a whole, they’ve tried to mimic a pair of bindings that can check all the boxes but ended up gearing them more towards freestyle and well-maintained slopes. The inner part of the highback has EVA padding which feels really comfortable no matter the type of boots you are wearing.

Baseplates

The footbed features high-density dampening materials which offer a plush experience that is ideal for beginners. More advanced snowboarders might look for something stiffer and harder that will give them better feedback from what is going on beneath their legs, though.

The baseplates themselves aren’t very flexible which in its own way corrects the flexibility of the rest of the bindings, adding to their all-mountain capabilities.

Straps

system mtn

The straps here are good and bad at the same time. What I mean is that they have quite a lot of unique characteristics but also a few weak spots that can show over time. For instance, since these bindings are rear-entry, they don’t really need you to do anything in order to put your boots in other than lower down the highback. The ankle strap opens up and closes as you move in and out. It also has a quick-fix level which sets the tightness to the one it was before you opened them. When riding, the straps also have an auto-tightening feature which tightens up to a certain level when your feet are jumping around a lot. Some people complained that over time the ratchets tend to come loose or even break, although I haven’t noticed similar issues for now. The front strap is a toe cap type of strap which is what I usually prefer and adds a decent amount of control to the person riding. Unlike the Burton Malavita snowboard bindings, though, it doesn’t double as a regular toe strap, which is a feature some people are looking for.

Materials

Everything here is corresponding to the price you are paying for these bindings. The EVA padding and overall quality of the materials is more than satisfactory. There are some 3D printed and modelled parts which is quite the unique feature for this price range.

Compatibility

These bindings have fully compatible base plates which have multi-discs in them allowing them to pair with any type of board, including the 4×2, 4×4, Burton 3D design, and the Burton Channel boards. There are some older Burton boards which won’t fit with these bindings, though, but those are quite rare nowadays.

Fit

In terms of fit, The System MTNs have Medium Fit (sizes 6 to 9), Large fit (sizes 9 to 11), and XL Fit which is sizes 11 to 14. The toe cap strap makes sure that whatever type of boots you have, they will have a snug fit and will be held into place nicely. That is one of the things that improves control and response from the board.

If you want to read more on some of the best all-mountain snowboard bindings, head over to my full Buyer’s Guide. There I’ve discussed the features you need to look for and have also showcased some of my favorite models for 2020. Now, let’s see which are the main pros and cons of this model…

Advantages & Disadvantages

Pros

  • Great budget option
  • Beginner-friendly
  • Easy rear-entry design
  • Toe cap strap
  • The ankle strap has a quick-adjust lever
  • Construction is well-built
  • Good flex for all-mountain conditions
  • Compatible with all types of boards

Cons

  • Straps don’t always hold too well
  • Buckles tend to come loose after heavy riding if not treated properly

For some of my top snowboarding tips for beginners, click here!

Conclusion & Rating

Our Rating: (4.5/5)

system mtn

As a whole, the System MTN rear-entry step-in snowboard bindings are one of the better budget options you can get this winter season. They are durable, very convenient, and most importantly – they are compatible with almost any board type out there, with a few exceptions in the older models. Even though some people complain that the buckets/ratchets don’t hold too well, I haven’t had those issues and for me, the ankle strap and toe cap strap configuration do a perfect job at keeping your fit in place, especially with their tightening feature which keeps your feet tightly linked to the board at all times. These bindings got a four and a half out of five stars rating from me!